Surviving Storm Emma

That’s a very dramatic title.  Sorry.  Here in the UK we now seem to love dramatic titles and headlines.  According to the press we are currently in the grip of ‘the beast from the East’ (a weather system blowing from the East) and ‘Storm Emma’.   A few years ago we would have called it ‘a spell of winter weather’ but I suppose that wouldn’t sell as many newspapers or get as much internet traffic as ‘the beast from the East’ ravaging us.  To put it in perspective, where I live, we’ve had approx 2 inches of snow with drifts of approx 4 feet in places, blown around by a 40mph breeze.   It’s lasted 3 days so far and caused widespread travel disruption closing roads and forcing train and bus operators to cancel services.  We don’t cope well with the winter weather; I get a bit embarrassed when I think about how some countries cope with months of ‘proper’ snow and drifts without a single sensational headline.

Sadly however there have been a few deaths caused by the winter weather so here is my guide to coping and maybe even thriving.

  1. Keep warm. Very obvious one to start with.  If you have to go out, spend a few minutes preparing what to wear.  To stay warm in this weather you need to keep dry, nothing cools you down like being wet (just think how lovely it is to jump into the pool on a scorching holiday in the sun and how effectively it cools you).  A suitable layer next to skin can help to move any sweat caused by exertion away from your skin so it stays dry.  Nothing feels more uncomfortable than a cold, damp tee-shirt against your skin.  A few layers then to keep hold of layers of warm air near your body and stop your heat from convecting away into the winter’s day. On the outside, a good waterproof layer.  If possible, a modern, breathable waterproof is best, lets the aforementioned sweat get out while still keeping the rain or snow out. Top the outfit off with a hat.   It used to be thought that 40-45% of body heat is lost from the head.  Modern sport science experiments have disproved this but you still lose approx 7% so a hat will make a difference.
  2. Check the news reports for advice on what the roads you’re planning to use are like. If the police are saying not to risk them then it’s probably best not to.  They’re not being spoilsports but are trying to prevent you from being yet another car they have to get towed from a ditch or snowdrift.
  3. If you do have to drive anywhere, prepare. Assume you will be delayed, possibly for a few hours.  Take spare warm clothes, even in your car it can get very cold out there if you’re not moving.  Make sure your mobile (cell) phone is charged or that you have a charger for it in the car.  Take a snack or a drink.
  4. If you’re on regular medication, consider taking it with you then in the worst case if you are delayed by several hours you won’t miss a scheduled dose.
  5. You don’t need to panic buy. In the UK bad weather only normally disrupts things for a couple of days at most.  If snow storms are predicted (and we do normally get a couple of days notice) then just make sure you’ve enough of the basics to last (don’t forget the wine and chocolate!).
  6. Make sure your neighbours are ok, especially the elderly. It may not be as easy for them to get to the shops in foul weather.

 

The local police have found the snow helpful.  One burglar was caught when the officers followed his footprints from the crime scene to where he was hiding.  A cannabis ‘grow house’ was found when it was noticed that it was the only house with no snow on its roof at the height of the storm.  The heat required to grow the plants in the loft had melted it as it landed.

So there you have it.  As always, though, at times of adversity, human goodness tends to shine through.  There are lots of stories of people volunteering to help stranded people providing food warmth and shelter.  Farmers and 4 wheel drive owners have been helping to tow stuck cars.

Keep warm and safe.

Keeping my mind tuned up.

This blog is about my mind and what I do to keep it healthy and to expand my brain. I like to read other blogs about how people manage to keep their minds healthy and active.  If we all share tips like this we can all maybe help each other a bit. I want to stress that this describes things which work for me.  I’m fortunate that I’m basically healthy mentally; all I suffer is the occasional low mood and some social anxiety.  If you suffer with the more serious conditions then I’m sure you realise that it’s expert professional help you need.

I’m not a mental health professional.  I want to stress that.  As a paramedic I’ve very little training in mental health, surprising when you consider how many cases we go to where mental health is the chief complaint.  I am however becoming an expert on me and my mind.  I’ve utmost respect for mental health professionals and always stress that if you have problems you shouldn’t hesitate to get professional help but one thing I’ve learned is that you don’t have to be a professional to help someone.  Just by being there and being prepared to listen and support someone can help a great deal.  Just listen without judging and without even trying to ‘fix’ things.  That may be enough to help a person through a crisis.  Encourage them and support them if necessary to go for professional help.

Talk about things on your mind.  We all know this one but don’t all do it.  I’m as bad as anyone at bottling things up but it really helps to have a few trusted friends in your circle who you feel comfortable talking to.  This next bit probably sounds a bit wrong but I think there comes a point where you have talked about some troubling event and continuing to go round in circles talking or thinking about it will make things worse.  There comes a point when you’ve analysed the event, learned from it, when you have to accept that you can’t change it or make it ‘un-happen’ by continuing to ruminate on it.  This is the point where you have to accept that it happened (I’m not saying that the event is acceptable.  It may be totally unacceptable and terrible but the fact is it has happened and you can’t change that, so it helps to accept that it happened).  This can be the difficult bit and where professional help may be needed. Once you’ve accepted it, maybe you can come up with a plan to improve things.  I found this the hard way: I had a particular problem I kept alive for 6 months by constant rumination and trying to analyse it.  Eventually I got so sick of it I just accepted it.  That was a huge weight off for me and I actually started to move on then.

It’s important not to ignore uncomfortable feelings and emotions.  In the past I’ve done this.  I’ve used distraction to take my mind off feelings it would have been better to face.  Thankfully my coping mechanisms weren’t too destructive.  I’ve avoided excessive alcohol and drugs but have watched many hours of mindless TV and read countless novels just to distract myself.  The thing is these feelings don’t just go away.  Experts tell us they hang around just out of sight (repressed), possibly building strength and cause problems from behind the scenes later (unexplained low moods or bursts of emotion at random triggers).  Now when faced with an uncomfortable or painful emotion I make a bit of time for myself and just feel it. It’s ok to cry at this point if you feel like it (I find this hard but they say it’s healthy and can be a relief). I concentrate on nice slow, deep, abdominal breathing and feel the feeling.  I try not to think about it or describe it to myself, just concentrate on feeling it and breathing.  If I find my mind starting to think about it, judge it or describe the feeling I focus once more on my breathing. I find that it passes after a while and doesn’t seem to cause problems later.  Sometimes the feeling may come back again but I just feel it again – it seems to be less intense and unpleasant the second and any subsequent times.  To date this had been successful for me.

This is the time of year when Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD (isn’t that an appropriate acronym?)) may start to take effect (here in the UK).  It causes the typical symptoms of depression and is associated with the shorter, darker days of autumn (fall) and winter.  The exact cause of SAD is not fully understood but it is thought that reduced exposure to light affects the way part of the brain (hypothalamus) works.  It may cause: over production of melatonin, the hormone which makes you feel sleepy and tired; under production of serotonin, the chemical which provides a feeling of well being.  The lower exposure to light is also thought to affect the natural sleep cycle (circadian rhythm) leading to symptoms of depression.  The self help methods for tackling SAD are quite logical.  Try to make the most of what natural daylight there is.  Spend time outside when you can, couple this with exercise – a nice long walk – and you increase the benefits.  Exercise on its own should help with the symptoms of low mood, even if it’s not outside.  Make sure you have a healthy diet.  Some people find artificial light helps; there are ‘natural light’ bulbs you can get for lamps which are said to help.  You can get special ‘light boxes’ which are very bright lights, I’ve never tried these.

Music always helps me.  Most of the time at home I have the radio on rather than the TV (I’m listening to ‘princess of the night’ by Saxon at the moment).  My taste in music isn’t to everyone’s taste but it really helps me.  I have various playlists on my phone of specific, upbeat rock songs guaranteed to help lift me in just about any situation.

To finish, I feel incredibly grateful for my life, I’m very lucky to be healthy, have a wonderful family and partner and feel I’m generally blessed.  My Grandma always told me to ‘count my blessings’ and I think that old advice about focussing on what is going right in your life and being thankful for it really helps to keep positive.

I wish you all health, relaxation, peace of mind and contentment.